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About Workers Comp

Workers compensation is the financial help for people that have been injured or hurt at work. Many companies try to take advantage of employees who have suffered a work-related injury by cutting their wages and not paying for medical costs. It’s important to understand your rights and know that you have options.

Understanding the different benefits which you are entitled to when you’ve been injured on the job is an important first step.   Each state has different rules regulating workers comp so make sure you’re looking in the right area while doing any sort of research concerning these types of benefits.

In fact, as required by law the Wisconsin Workers Compensation Act provides financial benefits for individuals that have been injured on the job. Examples of financial benefits may include:

Payment of Medical Expenses


Compensation for Lost Wages

Temporary Partial Disability (TPD)

Temporary partial disability (TPD) is best explained through an example. Let’s say that you were making $15 per hour at the time in which you got injured. If after the injury, the only work available to you is for $12 per hour (and you take the job), the insurance company must pay you the difference. This “difference” is known as TPD. If you have any questions about TPD, please contact us today.

Temporary Total Disability (TTD)

Temporary total disability (TTD) is paid to an injured worker if he or she is off of work completely or the employer cannot accommodate his or her temporary restriction(s). TTD payments amount to 2/3 of the injured worker’s average weekly wage and are tax free. For example, if your average weekly wage was $600, you would receive TTD checks for $400 (tax free). If the insurance company is not paying you the right amount or they have stopping paying you TTD, it is extremely important that you contact us immediately.


Permanent Disability

Permanent Partial Disability (PPD)

Permanent partial disability (PPD) is made up of two categories:

  • 1) Functional:
    Functional PPD is the percentage of permanent disability assigned by a doctor.
  • 2) Vocational:
    Vocational PPD is the percentage of permanency assigned by a vocational expert. The vocational expert takes the permanent restrictions assigned by a doctor, applies them to the labor market, and provides an assessment.

Permanent Total Disability (PTD)

Permanent total disability (PTD) means that you are completely disability for work-related purposes. PTD is awarded to an employee if he or she is so injured that he or she cannot perform any services and therefore, may be classified as totally disabled.


Loss of Earning Capacity

Loss of earning capacity: If you suffer a work injury to your head, neck, back, hip, or “body as a whole” AND your employer is unable to accommodate your restrictions (i.e. the employer does not have a job for you anymore), you may have a loss of earning capacity claim. Loss of earning capacity involves an injured worker receiving compensation because he or she cannot return to their previous job. Take for example a person who works for a construction company and hurts their back. Let’s also say this person makes $20 per hour. If this person is unable to return to their job as a construction worker because the company cannot accommodate their restrictions, he or she may have a loss of earning capacity claim. Note that additional factors come into play, such as wage, education, and age. If you have questions about “loss of earning capacity,” please feel free to contact our office during normal business hours.


Retraining

Retraining: If you suffer a work injury to your shoulder(s), elbow(s), wrist(s), hand(s), knee(s), or feet AND your employer is unable to accommodate your restrictions (i.e. the employer does not have a job for you anymore), you may have a retraining claim. Retraining involves an injured worker going to school so that they can “restore” their previous earning capacity. Take for example a person who works for a construction company and hurts their knee. Let’s also say that this person makes $20 per hour. If this person is unable to return to their job as a construction worker because the company cannot accommodate their restrictions, he or she may have a retraining claim. Note that additional factors come into play, such as wage, education, and age. If you have questions about “retraining,” please feel free to contact our office during normal business hours.


Death Benefits


It is important to note that while these benefits are available under the Wisconsin workers compensation laws, not all injured parties will qualify for all the benefits.  Depending on the nature and cause of the injury you may qualify for a different type of benefit and for a different length of time.  As could be expected, the more serious or permanent an injury the longer you can qualify for these types of benefits.  Having a good understanding of what types of benefits you can expect is very important.

Am I covered?

If you’ve been hurt while on the job you have a pretty good chance at being covered by this type of benefit.  Whether it was your fault or the fault of someone else’s negligence doesn’t always matter so the best thing you can do is to reach out to an expert in this area as soon as possible after the injury occurs.

Almost all employees in the state of Wisconsin are covered under the Workers Compensation Act. There are only a few exceptions that prevent certain individuals from being covered. If you are wondering about coverage, please view our coverage questions page or contact us today.

If you or a loved one has suffered a work-related injury, contact us immediately so we can help you get the compensation you deserve.